Necessity or Luxury: A Cost Analysis of Prescription Safety Glasses

We live in America: a land of luxury. There’s no doubt that we’ve come to rely on things like air conditioning, entertainment systems, and Internet accessibility as if they are inalienable rights passed down from our founding fathers. Perhaps the best proof that America is the land of luxury would be the sorts of useless goods sold in stores across America. The list of ridiculous consumer goods actually boggles the mind. There’s even a “Rapid Ramen Cooker” available for those poor souls who can’t wait three minutes for their “instant” noodles to finish cooking. Although some people raise concerns about America’s current financial situation, the amount of luxury goods that the average citizen is able to afford nearly strains believability.prescription-safetyglasses

Being aware of the glut of useless consumer goods is one thing. Overreacting against it is another. Just because America, as the land of plenty, produces an alarming amount of useless consumer products, that does not mean that every product it produces is useless and indulgent. And just because a product is only absolutely necessary to complete a certain task does not make it a luxury item.

Allow us to demonstrate: if you want to dig a hole, a shovel is not absolutely necessary. You can manage to dig a hole with other tools, to be sure. You can even dig with your bare hands. The process may take longer, but it can certainly be done. Does that mean that a shovel is a luxury item? Of course not.

It’s certainly true that in an effort to fight against the trend, some people may be tempted to go too far the other direction and consider everything a luxury, thereby robbing themselves of the ease and joy that certain purchases could afford them.

Many would equate having more money with having more stuff. While often true, this is not always the case. Charles Dickens’s famous miser, Ebenezer Scrooge, was wealthy but lived like a pauper. His lack of material possessions certainly did not give him more joy or contentment. In fact, it was a symptom of the spiritual emptiness he lived with until he was transformed (Rapid City Journal).

By the same token, prescription safety glasses are not luxuries either. Although you can easily complete your tasks without them, that doesn’t mean going without is the ideal situation. After all, you will only ever have one set of eyes. If something happens to damage them, not only will the medical costs be astronomical, but the chances of recovering from serious eye injuries are not very promising. The importance of caring for your eyes and maintaining good vision cannot be overstated. To that end, prescription safety glasses must be seen as necessities rather than luxuries.

As for how much prescription safety glasses will cost, the answer may surprise you. Considering the value of what they protect and how much money they will save in potential medical bills, the costs are practically negligible. Most of our sets run between $25-$65, although there are higher-end products available for those with very specific tastes. All things considered, this is a wise investment. For the same amount that you might spend on a single dinner at a restaurant, you can protect your eyes from potential harm.

How are we able to keep our costs so low? The answer is simple. Because we maintain our own prescription lab, we are able to complete all of our work in-house, significantly lowering our overhead. As with any business venture, cutting out the middleman benefits all involved. With low operating costs and efficient systems in place to meet orders quickly and correctly, we are able to pass along those savings to you, the consumer.

If you would like to hear more about our lines of quality prescription glasses, or if you have questions or comments about how our system works, please feel free to contact us. We look forward to serving you.

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